Looking over Voyageur Shoulder

Still Room for more.

Chief Black Hawk and Dr. Beaumont

Emma Big Bear and Victorian Lady

Aunt Marianne Labuche will be the next bronze sculpture. She was Prairie Du Chien's first Physician. She rescued and nursed her granddaughter, baby Louise Gagnier who had been scalped and left for dead. Photo is small replica.

Shelter

Dedicated in 2013, the Mississippi River Sculpture Park Shelter will provide families and friends to gather, share a meal, and imagine the possibilities.

Prairie du Chien Fourth Graders Enjoyed The Twilight of the Living Statues


Fourth graders attending The Twilight of the Living States on May 4, 2014, were asked what they thought of the event. Below you will find a few of their responses.
What was your favorite part of the MRSP and why?
  • Jacob-Dr. Beaumont because he was a self-taught doctor. I learned he helped with a bad wound
  • Janet-The Voyager because his performance was outstanding. I learned how rich in history this area is.
  • Domonic-Marianne Labuche because she helped a baby survive with a hole in her head. I learned I could be related to her.
  • Zoey-I really liked the Mound Builder's presentation. I learned what things could be found in a mound.
  • Sophia-My favorite part were the three Dousman Daughters because they asked me questions. I learned that the Dousman family didn't have electricity, so when we run out of power during a storm I will think of their family.
  • Audrey- I liked the Mastodon Hunter because it was interesting to learn about what they used spearheads for. I learned that if we always keep our eyes open especially after a heavy rain, we may find many historical treasures.
  • Brittany-My favorite part was the Victorian Lady because she was nice and looked so much like her statue. I learned that Victorian women did not show much skin in the older days.
  • Justin-My favorite was The Riverboat Captain because his song told part of his story. I learned they carried all kinds of stuff on their boats up and down the river.
  • Myah-My favorite was the British Redcoat because I had learned about them in school and now I got to see one up close. I learned that red is not a good color for a soldier to wear because he can be seen easier and then shot at more often.
  • Jesse-my favorite was Emma Big Bear because she was so nice. I learned how the Indians lived and how they had to hunt to survive.
  • Jon-My favorite was Chief Blackhawk because I liked how he acted. I learned how he was involved in the battle of Bad Axe and I liked his stick.
  • Sara-I liked Father Mazzuchelli because he got St. Gabriels church built. I learned that he was a good and helpful man.

    Fourth Graders were also asked why they thought the park was important to our community and why they think everyone should visit
  • to tell us of our history
  • it's important to know the history of our area
  • the history; lots of history of PdC
  • it's important to know about the past and I think people should come and see this place because it is so cool
  • gives us more info what PdC was like in the past
  • you should visit because you can learn lots of things you might not have known
  • it will enrich the historical informational result of our community
  • because it's a nice place!
  • because it has much information about history and past things. It also has beautiful statues of the amazing people who have done so much in PdC and around the world
  • everyone should visit so they can talk to "alive" history
  • because it is exciting to see what is already here and what will be coming. I can't wait!

When Sculptures Talk– mwnews – Dave Collins Video*

Sculpture_BlackhawkPrairie du Chien, WI - Something special happens when people channel a statue, history comes flooding back in a way that a book can’t convey. A person in costume taking on the persona of a historical figure, telling verbally what it was like for them at that point in history makes it real. Humans are story tellers. We empathize with someone when we meet person to person. The sculpture park in Prairie du Chien on St. Feriole Island had a group of volunteers bring the park’s sculptures of historical figures to life. See video highlights (HD - watch full screen). mwnews.net 

Nearly an estimated 125 people strolled through the Mississippi River Sculpture Park to listen and ask questions of statues come to life.   The event marked the official kickoff of a major fund raising campaign to bring to life the sixth bronze sculpture– Marianne Labuche.

Five life sized sculptures: Black Hawk, Dr. Beaumont and son Israel, Victorian Lady, Julian Coryer - Voyageur, and Emma Big Bear are already installed.

The statues that came to life were:

  • Emma Big Bear
  • Riverboat Captain
  • Marianne Labuche
  • Mastodon Hunter
  • Victorian Lady
  • British Redcoat
  • Chief Blackhawk
  • An archaeologist
  • Father Jacques Marquette
  • Dousman Daughters

The event also marked the introduction of Friends of the Mississippi River Sculpture Park.  Becoming a Friend is a great way to get your family involved and to do as much or as little as you'd like. Additional information can be found here.

***

HD Video by mwnews – Dave Collins

Photo (by Dave Collins): Todd Crotty portraying Chief Blackhawk.

Twilight of the Living Statues

 

Nearly an estimated 125 people strolled through the Mississippi River Sculpture Park to listen and ask questions of statues come to life.   The event marked the official kickoff of a major fund raising campaign to bring to life the sixth bronze sculpture– Marianne Labuche.

The event also marked the introduction of Friends of the Mississippi River Sculpture Park.  Becoming a Friend is a great way to get your family involved and to do as much or as little as you'd like. Additional information can be found here.

The photo, left, shows a small scale model of Marianne Labuche, called a maquette. The maquette stands about 15 inches and is cast in bronze.

Marianne Labuche was a local healer known as “Aunt Mary Ann” by her faithful followers in the early 1800s. Marianne Labuche was the first person to heal the sick in Wisconsin. Her patients called her "Aunt Mary Ann".  Labuche came up the Mississippi River about 1790.  She filled a crucial need in the Wisconsin frontier with her knowledge of herbs, midwifery, and Native American and folk medicine. Until a fort was erected in Prairie du Chien, 1816, and a surgeon arrived, she attended the sick and attended to them as a physician, and charged fees.

After the Fort, she continued to practice among the people of Prairie du Chien. Her talents were put to the test on June 26, 1827, when her baby granddaughter was critically injured during an Indian attack. Labuche covered the exposed brain with a silver plate over which the skin healed. The little girls lived to be eighty years old. An online story can be read here.

Five life sized sculptures: Black Hawk, Dr. Beaumont and son Israel, Victorian Lady, Julian Coryer - Voyageur, and Emma Big Bear are already installed.

The statues that came to life were:

  • Emma Big Bear
  • Riverboat Captain
  • Marianne Labuche
  • Mastodon Hunter
  • Victorian Lady
  • British Redcoat
  • Chief Blackhawk
  • An archaeologist
  • Father Jacques Marquette
  • Dousman Daughters

 

Additional Photos of the event can be viewed here.

Living Statues–May 4, 2014

unnamed  If the rain doesn't stick around on May 4, some of the statues, present and future, will join visitors at the Mississippi River Sculpture Park, from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m.  If rain shows up on Sunday, May 4, Twilight of the Living Statues (TOLS) will be postponed until Saturday, May 10.
     Last year, as this photo shows, three statues chatted with a few of the many visitors to the Twilight of the Living Statues while Dr. Beaumont and his son rested next to their bronze images.
Which statues will show up this year?
  • Emma Big Bear....Chloe Lorenz
  • Riverboat Captain....Mike McCoy
  • Marianne Labuche....Alice Kirschbaum
  • Mastodon Hunter....Mike Valley
  • Victorian Lady....Janet Finn
  • British Redcoat...Robert Carlson
  • Chief Blackhawk.....Todd Crotty
  • Mound builder...Dennis Kirschbaum
  • Marquette and Joliet....Ethan Swiggum and Owen Feye
  • Dousman Daughters...Diamond Iverson
  • Another Dousman daughter and other living statues might surprise us too.  If the rain date is the right date, we'll send another update.

Twilight of the Living Statues

PhotoTwilight of the Living Statues is a FREE event,  open to all families. It  will be held on Sunday, May 4, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Mississippi River Sculpture Park. The Mississippi Sculpture Park is located across the street from the Villa Louis mansion. Visitors are encouraged to get into the “spirit” and come dressed as their favorite historical figure or persona. Visitors are invited to bring their own snacks and beverages. 

The Sculpture Park is where fine art brings history to life.  Life-sized bronze figures from the pages of history and prehistory gather together around a fire-ring, as if meeting for a present day rendezvous. Already installed are: Chief Blackhawk, Dr. Beaumont and son Israel, Victorian Lady, The Voyageur, and Emma Big Bear.
Visitors to this year’s event will listen to vignettes presented by costumed local high school students and area talent who have been working with Luana Stiemke,  PdC Parks and Recreation drama teacher and music teacher for St. Gabriels’ School.   Each “living statue” will tell their story of how their life made an impact on the history of southwest Wisconsin and northeast Iowa.
Visitors will also listen to live music in the background while exploring the new addition of the Leamy Shelter as well as the newly developing Trees of the Visiting Presidents  being installed north of the Sculpture Park.
The “Fun-Raising” Follies event, held in January in the Little Theater at the Prairie du Chien High School, “kicked off” our 2014 fund-raising efforts to “bring to life” Marianne Labuche (pronounced “La-BOOSH”), Wisconsin’s first doctor. 
Marianne Labuche was a local healer known as “Aunt Mary Ann” by her faithful followers in the early 1800s. Marianne Labuche used a medallion, about the same size as the token given to each participating fourth grader, to save a child’s life from a scalping attack. Labuche’s living statue will be roaming around during the event telling tales about her life and work.
Visitors' generous donations will be gladly accepted to help continue the task of bringing Marianne Labuche's bronze life-sized statue to a permanent home in the park

Bluffview 4th grade children are strongly encouraged to attend the event with their families.  Each year the fourth graders are required to do a report on historical figures as part of their curriculum.  Cindy Hertrampf, a retired teacher from the area (who also serves on the Sculpture Park event committee) and teacher Mary Gasser created an opportunity for all 4th grade students to learn more information for his/her required class report.
Each fourth grader attending will receive a special token with historical significance. On the Monday after the event, those students with tokens will be invited to fill out a three-question survey reflecting on their experiences at the Mississippi River Sculpture Park event. Some of those wonderful 4th grade “insights” from the upcoming surveys are planning to be published in an upcoming Courier Press issue.
Should Sunday, May 4th prove to be too rainy for this outdoor event, the rain date will be Saturday, May 10th (the day before Mother’s Day). For more information, contact Sculpture Park board president Rogeta Halvorson at RAHalvorson@alpinecom.net or 563-880-9190.